Key Stage Information

Key Stage 3

Within the first two weeks of Year 7, students are given an initial assessment to decide which mathematics set they will go into - Key Stage 2 results will also be taken into consideration. 

Throughout the year, three further assessments will take place to allow for set changes, but, if the class teacher feels that a move is in the best interest of the student, this can occur at any stage throughout the year.  However, we do feel it is important to give one month's notice of a possible set move down and a letter will be sent home if a student is struggling - very often this warning letter is sufficient to rectify the situation.

In Year 8, as in Year 7, we set three assessments and set moves occur as explained above.

In Year 9, students have an assessment before Christmas and then in May.  On the basis of these results, together with discussions with class teachers, sets for Year 10 will be organised.  After the May assessment, students begin the GCSE Mathematics syllabus at either Higher or Foundation Level.

The KS3 programme of study allows students to be taught key processes that will assist their development for KS4.  This will include functional skills that will take the form of project-based classwork and homework.

Revision Websites

The Maths VLE has revision lists for every exam and PowerPoint tutorials on all topics covered in Key Stage 3.

  • Mymaths - Revision lessons and outline tests for nearly every topic in Key Stages 3, 4 and 5.  All students write their passwords into their planners at the start of the year.
  • Mangahigh - Has many fun games to help students learn Maths topics.
  • BBC Bitesize Maths - Lots of excellent tutorials and mini tests.  There are also games to help you relax.
  • Subtangent - Use the 'Revise and Test Yourself' sections.  There are also Maths games for a spare moment.
  • Maths Year 2000 (Count On) - Lots of games to help practise Maths skills.

Key Stage 4

The GCSE KS4 course is a natural progression from work at KS3 and students study a wider range of topics at a deeper level.  The course is 100% final examination assessed and there will be two examination papers - one with and one without a calculator.  There is now a greater emphasis on 'functional mathematics' and some of the questions are designed to test how the students apply their knowledge.

There are two tiers of entry:

  • GCSE Tier H (Higher) is a course intended to be followed by the higher sets.  Students taking this exam will be credited with one of A*, A, B, C or D grades.  Students entered for this tier who do not attain Grade D do not gain any qualification.
  • GCSE Tier F (Foundation) follows a similar syllabus to the Higher tier, but both the level of content and level of difficulty are reduced.  GCSE grades C, D, E, F or G are obtainable.  Students entered for this tier who do not attain Grade G do not gain any qualification.

The two tiers of entry allow every student the opportunity to obtain a Grade C or above.  Students who are on the margins of one of these tiers will be recommended a tier of entry after the Year 11 mock examinations.

All students need a scientific calculator and the basic equipment required as part of the examination requirements.

All Year 11 students will sit their GCSE examination in November and, depending on the grade awarded, will be offered the opportunity to improve or undertake a further GCSE in Statistics.

GCSE Revision Websites

The Year 11 Maths VLE has revision lists for the exams, PowerPoint tutorials and GCSE past papers for you to download and try.

  • Mymaths - Revision lessons and outline tests for nearly every topic in Key Stages 3, 4 and 5. All students write their passwords into their planners at the start of the year.
  • BBC Bitesize Maths - Lots of excellent tutorials and mini tests.  You can try specimen GCSE exam paper.  There are also games to help you relax.
  • Subtangent - Use the 'Revise and Test Yourself' sections.  There are also Maths games for a spare moment.
  • Maths Goodies - An American website.  A lot of the help is free, but for some bits you need to order a CD - the free bits are good!
  • Maths Guru - Use the left-hand bar to navigate to GCSE resources.  There are lots of revision notes and a whole load of practice questions, either by tier of entry of by topic.  The answers are also there, so don't cheat!  You can use the answers to check how you have done.
  • GCSE.com - A load of really good tutorials on all sorts of Maths topics.
  • S-Cool - A lot of very good tutorials to follow.  Also some questions and very useful revision summaries - these could be used as revision cards.

 

Key Stage 5

Entry Requirements:

  • To study A-level Mathematics -  at least Grade B in Mathematics at GCSE

  • To study A-level Further Mathematics - at least Grade A in Mathematics at GCSE

Year 12

In Year 12 students study two modules of Pure Mathematics (C1 and C2) and one module of Statistics (S1).  Examinations will be sat in all three units.  The Pure Mathematics modules extent their knowlege of Algebra, Co-ordinate Geometry, Sequences and Trigonometry, as well as introducing radian measure, logarithms, exponential functions, Binomial expansion and Calculus.  The S1 module builds on the statistical techniques introduced at GCSE and includes Representation and summary of data, Probability, Correlation, Regression, Discrete random variables and the Normal Distribution.

Year 13

In Year 13 students extend their skills in Pure Mathematics by covering modules C3 and C4.  These modules enhance the techniques for Algebra, Calculus, Trigonometry, Numerical Methods  and Vectors.  Mechanics (M1) is the third unit covered and includes kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line, dynamics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane, statics of a particle, and Moments.

Further Mathematics

In addition to the modules covered in the Mathematics A-Level, students in Year 12 will be taught Further Pure Maths (FP1), Decision Mathematics (D1) and Statistics (S2).

In Year 13 the modules the are Further Pure Maths (FP2), Decision Mathematics (D2) and Mechanics (M2).

Further Mathematics will cover many topics that are at the core of modern technology

  • The Algorithms, Network Design, Linear Programming and Simulation.  Critical Path Analysis, covered in the Decision Mathematics module, is used in computing, telecoms and business management.
  • Matrix Transformations are fundamental to the design of gaming software, enabling movement and morphing.
  • Imaginary Numbers, Vectors, Series and Trigonometry are vital for Physics and Electronic Engineering.
  • The Mechanics modules support the acceleration, force, work, energy and power topics studied in Physics.
  • The statistical techniques are widely used in Science, Business, Economics, Biology and Geography.